UT69 Movie Review: Rather than travelling to a theatre to witness Raj Kundra’s struggle (to act), it would have been preferable to travel to a jail.

 

It’s getting old, this Raj Kundra satire!

Rating for the movie UT69:

Raj Kundra as the star cast
Shahnawaz Ali is the director.

What’s Good: The title tune of Dhadkan!
What’s Bad: The efforts made to fool you are, at most, incredibly mediocre.
Loo Break: You are allowed to take a break each time they display a loo!

Should I Watch? Only watch if you wish to remain in the dark!

Spoken in Hindi

Available On: Theatrical Distribution (avoid it even if it comes out on OTT)
Runtime: 1 hour 57 minutes (the longest)

Customer Evaluation:

He experiences some heartbreaking, soul-wrenching, and nerve-wracking moments in jail, such as not having access to a toothbrush or shampoo for his hair and spending his jail time making comparisons to OJ Simpson, who was controversially acquitted for the murders of his wife and friend.

You’ll notice that the story touches on all the low-hanging fruit when it comes to telling a jail-struggle scenario, from how horrible the food is in the jail to Raj Kundra exclaiming, “Welcome to the Raj Kundra’s sh*t-life.” He promises to make a movie on the prisoners while he waits for his bail and gets along well with them. What about us, though? Why is watching it a punishment?

Review of UT69: A Script Analysis

UT69 Movie Review: Rather than travelling to a theatre to witness Raj Kundra's struggle (to act), it would have been preferable to travel to a jail.
UT69 Movie Review: Rather than travelling to a theatre to witness Raj Kundra’s struggle (to act), it would have been preferable to travel to a jail.

I know there may be some legality surrounding the matter for which Raj served time in jail, which is why he was prohibited from discussing those things in the movie, but why film an entire movie about issues that, due to their arrogant presentation, make no one feel sorry for them?

This could just as easily have been a boring book, a documentary, or a short film; there was no need for it to be a feature film that required viewers to pay to see something they already knew from daily newspapers.
Yes, we are aware that some jails have poor food quality, that there isn’t enough room for inmates to sleep comfortably, and that there are no facilities to make life enjoyable inside; but what exactly is the point of the movie? Because it fails terribly flat on its face to elicit pity for the main character.

Where credit is due, thanks to Kevin Thanks to Vikram Bhatti’s strong writing during the sleeping at night sequence, Jason Crasta’s drama and photography are constructed exceptionally well, supported by Prince Mulla’s powerful BGM. That level of rawness was expected from subsequent sequences as well. The jail’s flaws are depicted in Neeraj Kumar Singh’s sets in a realistic manner without coming across as manufactured.

Review of UT69: A Star Performance

While Raj Kundra’s performance isn’t as poor as some other non-actors, it’s still not up to the calibre of the actor this tale needed to establish a connection with the audience.

The inmate who portrays Raj Kundra’s close friend acts the best, while the other inmates are all convincing. With his portrayal, the constable who is depicted as Shilpa Shetty’s fan is also natural.

UT69 Movie Review: Scope, Score

Making his directorial debut, Shahnawaz Ali uses all the corny clich├ęs associated with creating a jail movie, thus it doesn’t really grab your attention. This satire wears me out.
The background music by Prince Mulla is passable but repetitive. He seems to have gotten a few set pieces just right, so he uses them over and over until you start to become a little tired of it. Ultimately, the song works well for a debutant as a stand-alone track.

Review of UT69: The Final Word

All in all, the majority of the cast members are making their first appearances in motion pictures, and the producers proudly display the label “debutant” along with the actors’ names in the closing credits, pleading with us to overlook their initial error.

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