Review of “Amar Singh Chamkila”: Imtiaz Ali’s deserving film features an electrifying performance from Diljit Dosanjh.

By Gita Samanta May13,2024
Review of "Amar Singh Chamkila": Imtiaz Ali's deserving film features an electrifying performance from Diljit Dosanjh.Review of "Amar Singh Chamkila": Imtiaz Ali's deserving film features an electrifying performance from Diljit Dosanjh.

Review of the film “Amar Singh Chamkila”: Diljit Dosanjh’s portrayal of the renowned Punjabi singer and the film’s soundtrack alone make it worthwhile to see.

 

Briefly, “Amar Singh Chamkila” was made available on Netflix on April 12.

In the role of Amar Singh Chamkila, Diljit Dosanjh excels.

Imtiaz Ali directed the film.

 

Release Date: April 12, 2024

Review of "Amar Singh Chamkila": Imtiaz Ali's deserving film features an electrifying performance from Diljit Dosanjh.
Review of “Amar Singh Chamkila”: Imtiaz Ali’s deserving film features an electrifying performance from Diljit Dosanjh.

The title character of the mysterious Punjabi folk singer Chamkila, whose successful career is cut short by his violent death, is portrayed by Diljit Dosanjh.

 

The man who has lost his “Ustaad” and the police officer looking into his murder have a talk in the middle of the sorrow, and the tone changes suddenly. With their blood tainting the Punjabi music scene, Chamkila and his wife Amarjot Kaur seem miserable as they are shrouded in white sheets.

 

The movie is a remarkable chronicle of a man whose courage ruined him and made him a great star at the same time. The most remarkable thing about it is that we can nearly always witness both his ascent to fame and his impending fall from grace happening simultaneously. Even in the face of threats to his life from terrorists from Khalistani province and rival musicians, Chamkila never fails to captivate audiences with his unique charm.

 

“Amar Singh Chamikla” appears to be a biographical drama at first, but it delves deeper into the themes of evil, innocence, and a man’s drive to prove his worth in the face of mounting criticism. I agree with music director AR Rahman, who tells The Hindu that “Imtiaz has reinvented himself” with the film, that director Imtiaz Ali has walked away from his well-known post-teen love clichés.

 

The emotional connection to “Amar Singh Chamkila” is strengthened by the film’s time travel and utilization of archive material from a variety of sources, including stage performances of Chamkila and Amarjot in Punjab. It’s difficult to understand why certain situations are so cartoonish. They are pleasantly brief in their on-screen appearance even though they are ineffective.

 

The film’s success can be attributed to its potent narrative as well as the performances and soundtrack.

 

Unaltered by Imtiaz and Rahman, Chamkila’s original songs have retained the nostalgia for his followers and introduced many, like me, to his music from four decades ago. In addition to his own song, AR Rahman and lyricist Irshad Kamil have skillfully incorporated the earthy tone of Amar Singh Chamkila’s music into their own works.

 

In a shot from “Amar Singh Chamkila,” Diljit Dosanjh and Parineeti Chopra are shown.

 

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A fitting description of Chamkila’s ascent to fame during the 1984 riots can be found in the song “Baaja,” which has vocals by Mohit Chauhan: “It was a difficult time, he was afraid, but he shone in such times…with his teasing, sexy songs.” “Sakht waqt tha, woh bhay bhayyanak tha..Chamkila chamka aise mein…Chhedta chhabeela, bistaron ki leela.”

 

The Punjabi song “Bol Mohabbat” features stunning vocals by Rahman, but Diljit and Parineeti’s “live” renditions of Chamkila and Amarjot’s songs are even more impressive.

 

Electric, vulnerable, naive, assertive, and everything else Diljit Dosanjh needs to be to fully convey the attraction of the man who rocked Punjab in the 1980s, Diljit Dosanjh is amazing in the part. He is a major factor in the movie’s attraction. Parineeti is a good fit for the modest, timid, and obedient Amarjot character.

 

Every one of Chamkila’s cronies—some of whom have strikingly similar appearances to their true selves—performs their absolute best work in a short amount of time. With his precise comedic timing and masterful handling of intense moments, actor Anjum Batra, who plays Kesar Singh Tikki, the first musician to work with Chamkila, steals the show.

 

As Amar Singh Chamkila, Diljit Dosanjh gives a flawless performance.

 

The moral of the film is harsh, depressing, and unavoidable: Though he never embraced his transformation from a Dalit laborer to a respected musician, Amar Singh Chamkila was a man who brought joy to a great many people but felt very little of his own. He regarded himself as his audience’s “servant” at all times.

 

“Apne sunne vaalon ka ghulam tha woh (There was a major flaw in Chamkila)” His friend Swarn Sivia (played by Apinderdeep Singh) remarks in the movie, “He remained a servant to his listeners).”

 

Even just for the soundtrack and Diljit Dosanjh’s performance, “Amar Singh Chamkila” is worth seeing. What makes it unique is that it delves deeper and provides us with a sense of the man himself. Imtiaz Ali immediately empathizes with Chamkila both as a man and as a performer.

 

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